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Life Statistics

Today I used Excel to analyze total email volume and client specific email volume data (sent/received) weighted by an "effort" ranking to help highlight work flow at the office. In the interest of not having to check my email as much as I am currently, I hoped to shed light on prioritization of time spent with email vs projects. 


My hope is to only check my email twice a day... But, given the client service that my role entails, that's probably not gonna happen. One thing that came out of my analysis though is when getting the most email (day of week/time of day) is most probable. It turns out Tuesday mornings and Friday afternoons are the most likely times for stuff to hit the proverbial "fan."


In other life statistics news (and productivity measures), I'm tracking my time spent during the day in a manner similar to the "hyper tracking" concept I've learned from listening to The Better Guy Show podcasts (available on iTunes). In the next week I'm going to post my findings of how I utilize my time...


stay tuned.

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